"Does bottled water contain microplastics?"

Basis of its supposed purity is how bottled water is often advertised and sold to consumers on the media / web. However, every time you consume the drink, you may be ingesting thousands of tiny pieces of plastic waste, according to a major new study conducted by researchers at the State University of New York at Fredonia.Does this water contain micro-plastics? polypropylene, nylon and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were the result of the research—which was commissioned by non-profit journalism organization Orb Media. They found that 93 percent of 259 bottles from 11 leading international brands were contaminated with plastics, as such.  Single litre of bottled water can contain thousands of micro-plastic particles as per New Orb Media research and reporting. Exclusive tests on more than 250 bottles from 11 leading brands worldwide reveal widespread contamination with plastic debris including polypropylene, nylon, and polyethylene terephthalate (PET).

Clothing, industrial processes, cosmetics, packaging and the degradation of larger plastic items are all possible sources of Micro-plastics—which originate from a variety of sources, including, this contamination comes in the form of tiny particles called with the rise in plastics manufacture. Freshwater lakes, inland seas, rivers, wetlands and organisms from plankton to whales (and nearly every species in between) have been found to be sources of micro-plastics. There has been an associated rise in plastic pollution of the external environment, most famously within the world’s oceans, the authors wrote in the study. But more recently plastic pollution has been found within 

Ranging from zero particles to more than 10,000 in single container, the researchers found a huge variation in the quantity of plastic in each bottle. Based on their results, they concluded that the global average was 325 particles per litre. Although some are larger, ninety-five percent of these particles are between 6.5 and 100 micro-meters in size. 100 micro-meters is about the width of a human hair. To give some context, As per Dan Morrison, author of the Orb Media report, some bottles had very high concentrations of particles per litre, and others had very low concentrations, told Newsweek. 

That was as notable a result as the numbers themselves. One bottle could have a very high number of particles and the bottle sitting next to it could have a very low number of particles among bottles purchased from the same case. Nile red tagging, which was pioneered by scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA), in the U.K.To identify the micro-plastics in the bottled water, the team used a screening technique known as 93 percent of the samples showed plastic contamination. 325 particles per litre was the calculated global average. Particle concentration ranged from zero to more than 10,000 likely plastic particles in a single bottle. The study was supervised by Dr. Sherri Mason, a leading micro-plastics researcher, Chair of the Department of Geology and Environmental Sciences at the State University of New York at Fredonia. 
What this means for human health is unknown. The basis of its supposed purity is how bottled water is often advertised and sold to consumers on the media/web. However, every time you consume the drink, you may be ingesting thousands of tiny pieces of plastic waste, according to a major new study conducted by researchers at the State University of New York at Fredonia.

Does this water contain micro-plastics? polypropylene, nylon and polyethene terephthalate (PET) was the result of the research—which was commissioned by non-profit journalism organization Orb Media. They found that 93 percent of 259 bottles from 11 leading international brands were contaminated with plastics, as such.  A single litre of bottled water can contain thousands of micro-plastic particles as per New Orb Media research and reporting. Exclusive tests on more than 250 bottles from 11 leading brands worldwide reveal widespread contamination with plastic debris including polypropylene, nylon, and polyethene terephthalate (PET).

Clothing, industrial processes, cosmetics, packaging and the degradation of larger plastic items are all possible sources of Micro-plastics—which originate from a variety of sources, including, this contamination comes in the form of tiny particles called with the rise in plastics manufacture. Freshwater lakes, inland seas, rivers, wetlands and organisms from plankton to whales (and nearly every species in between) have been found to be sources of micro-plastics. There has been an associated rise in plastic pollution of the external environment, most famously within the world's oceans, the authors wrote in the study. But more recently plastic pollution has been found within Ranging from zero particles to more than 10,000 in a single container, the researchers found a huge variation in the quantity of plastic in each bottle. Based on their results, they concluded that the global average was 325 particles per litre. Although some are larger, ninety-five percent of these particles are between 6.5 and 100 micro-meters in size. 100 micro-meters is about the width of a human hair. To give some context, As per Dan Morrison, author of the Orb Media report, some bottles had very high concentrations of particles per litre, and others had very low concentrations, told Newsweek. 

That was as notable a result as the numbers themselves. One bottle could have a very high number of particles and the bottle sitting next to it could have a very low number of particles among bottles purchased from the same case. Nile red tagging, which was pioneered by scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA), in the U.K.To identify the micro-plastics in the bottled water, the team used a screening technique known as 93 percent of the samples showed plastic contamination. 325 particles per litre were the calculated global average. Particle concentration ranged from zero to more than 10,000 likely plastic particles in a single bottle. The study was supervised by Dr Sherri Mason, a leading micro-plastics researcher, Chair of the Department of Geology and Environmental Sciences at the State University of New York at Fredonia.

 What this means for human health is unknown.

Brands tested included Aqua (Danone), Aquafina (PepsiCo), Bisleri (Bisleri International), Dasani (Coca-Cola), Epura (PepsiCo), Evian (Danone), Gerolsteiner (Gerolsteiner Brunnen), Minalba (Grupo Edson Queiroz), Nestlé Pure Life (Nestlé), San Pellegrino (Nestlé), and Wahaha (Hangzhou Wahaha Group).

Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Lebanon, Mexico, Thailand, samples came from five continents including, these countries and the United States in 19 locations in nine countries. The majority of the samples came in plastic bottles. Water in glass bottles also held micro-plastic.

Brands tested included Aqua (Danone), Aquafina (PepsiCo), Bisleri (Bisleri International), Dasani (Coca-Cola), Epura (PepsiCo), Evian (Danone), Gerolsteiner (Gerolsteiner Brunnen), Minalba (Grupo Edson Queiroz), Nestlé Pure Life (Nestlé), San Pellegrino (Nestlé), and Wahaha (Hangzhou Wahaha Group).

Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Lebanon, Mexico, Thailand, samples came from five continents including, these countries and the United States in 19 locations in nine countries. The majority of the samples came in plastic bottles. Water in glass bottles also held micro-plastic.